Alabama Ex-Offender Voting Rights

In all states, it's a felony to vote if your voting rights are currently revoked. If you are uncertain about your status from the information provided on this page, call 1-866-OUR-VOTE for more information.

Misdemeanor conviction in Alabama

You do not lose your right to vote if you are convicted of a misdemeanor in Alabama, even while incarcerated. If you are incarcerated for a misdemeanor you should check voter registration status, register to vote if necessary, and request an absentee ballot from office administrators at your complex.

You can vote while awaiting trial for any charge, even if incarcerated, as long as you have not lost your right to vote due to a prior conviction.

Felony conviction not of moral turpitude in Alabama

You do not lose your right to vote if you are convicted of a felony that is not a “crime of moral turpitude”. If you are incarcerated for a felony that is not of moral turpitude you should check voter registration status, register to vote if necessary, and request an absentee ballot from office administrators at your complex.  If you are unsure if your conviction qualifies as a felony of moral turpitude, call 1-866-OUR-VOTE for more information.

Felony conviction of moral turpitude in Alabama

There are 46 crimes of moral turpitude that cause a loss of voting rights, however, rights can be restored if certain conditions are met. Your voting rights are permanently removed if you have been convicted of treason, were impeached, or have received the death penalty.

If you have been convicted of a crime of moral turpitude and have already received either:

  •  a pardon that includes restoration of civic rights

  •  a Certificate of Eligibility to Register to Vote

 Submit a copy of your pardon or certificate to your county board of registrars and register to vote.

Voting rights restoration for eligible crimes of moral turpitude

You may apply for a Certificate of Eligibility to Register to Vote if the following conditions are met:


1. You have no pending felony charges in state or federal court.

2. You have paid all fines, court costs, fees, and restitution ordered at the time of conviction (fees after conviction are not included).

3. One (or more) of the following is true:

      a. You have been released following the completion of your sentence.

      b. You have been pardoned.

      c. You have completed probation or parole and have been released from compliance.


Pardonable felonies of moral turpitude:

Murder, rape, sodomy, sexual abuse, sexual torture, enticing a child to enter a vehicle for immoral purposes, soliciting a child by computer, production or possession of obscene matter, parents or guardians permitting children to engage in obscene matter, possesion of child pornography with intent to distribute.

For a complete list of crimes and their statuses, you can check this page.

Next steps for restoring voting rights in Alabama

Contact the Board of Pardons and Paroles to begin the Certificate of Eligibility to Register to Vote application process. Applicants can begin the process by visiting the Pardons and Paroles office in the county where they currently live or by calling (334) 353-7771 or (334) 353-8067.

For assistance with the CERV process, applicants can contact Blair Bowie at the Campaign Legal Center by calling 202-736-2201 or emailing [email protected]

For other questions, call 1-866-OUR-VOTE


Helpful U.S. Vote Foundation Resources

Click here for help with: 

  • Registering to vote

  • Requesting an absentee ballot

  • Requesting a mail-in ballot

Click here for help with finding your Election Official.